Set of classic cocktails: Dirty Martini, Sherry Cobbler, Brandy Crusta, Margarita, Cobras Fang,Tom Collins and Captain James Cook arranged on the bar counter
Food + Drink

10 International Cocktail Recipes to Whip Up at Home

There are few activities more transporting than sipping on a fine drink from another country. We gathered up 10 tried-and-true cocktail recipes from around the world that will instantly transport you to Mexico, Italy, Brazil, and beyond. 

See recent posts by David Hattan

Homemade Delicious Red Sangria with Limes Oranges and Apples

Spain: Sangria

Few drinks go better with a warm summer day than a glass of sangria. This Spanish wine punch is ubiquitous across the country, and most restaurants have their own house blend. Although there are endless recipe variations on what makes a “classic” sangria, this one is our favorite. You don’t need an expensive bottle of wine, either—a simple Spanish table wine like Campo Viejo Rioja will do.

IngredientsHow to Make It
– 2 bottles red wine
– 1 cup brandy
– 1/2 cup triple sec
– 1 cup orange juice
– 1 cup pomegranate juice
– 1/2 cup simple syrup
– Diced apples, oranges, pears
– Soda water (optional)
Mix all ingredients together in a large pitcher or sealed container and chill for two hours or more (preferably overnight) in a refrigerator. Add a splash of soda water before serving if you’d like.
Refreshing Pimms Cup Cocktail on a Bar

England: Pimm’s Cup

This refreshing drink was first made in a London oyster bar sometime between 1823 and 1840 and is still wildly popular in the U.K. today. Made with lemonade and the slightly sweet and herbal Pimm’s, it’s a perfect drink for happy hour, brunch, or watching tennis—it’s the official drink of Wimbledon, after all.

IngredientsHow to Make It
– 1 inch cucumber, sliced (save one piece for garnish)
– 2 oz Pimms no. 1
– 1 tbsp lemon juice
– 1/4 tsp sugar
– Ginger beer
Lemon slice
Lace cucumber slices into a cocktail shaker and mash with a muddler or the back of a wooden spoon. Add Pimm’s, lemon juice, and sugar. Add ice and shake vigorously. Strain Pimm’s mixture into a glass filled with ice and top with ginger beer. Garnish with a slice of cucumber and lemon wedge.
Classic Lime Daiquiri Cocktail with a Garnish

Cuba: Hemingway Daiquiri

A favorite of Ernest Hemingway, the prolific writer would often go through almost a dozen of these at his go-to bar El Floridita in Havana, Cuba. (Psst—if you want to make a daiquiri as close to the Havana Club original as possible, grab a bottle of Flor de Caña.) This classic can be served up or blended with ice for a frosty twist.

IngredientsHow to Make It
– 2 oz white rum
– 3/4 oz lime juice
– 1/2 oz simple syrup
– 1/2 oz maraschino liqueur
Add all ingredients to a cocktail shaker filled with ice and shake well. Strain into a chilled coupe glass.
Raffles Hotel Singapore

Singapore: Singapore Sling

The Singapore Sling might be the most complex drink on this list to make, but the results are well worth the trouble. It was originally created at the Raffles hotel in Singapore as a more acceptably feminine-looking drink for women (due to its pink color). The Long Bar is now an essential stop in Singapore for lovers of history and mixology. Can’t find Cherry Heering or Benedictine at your local liquor store? Have them delivered!

IngredientsHow to Make It
– 1 1/2 oz gin
– 1/2 oz Cherry Heering
– 1/4 oz Cointreau
– 1/4 oz Benedictine
– 3 oz pineapple juice
– 1/2 oz lime juice
– 1/4 oz grenadine
– dash bitters
Add all ingredients to a cocktail shaker filled with ice and shake well. Strain into an ice-filled collins glass.
A Negroni cocktail, made from equal parts Campari, gin, and red vermouth in a rocks glass with ice and an orange twist. The drink is in a dark luxurious bar and there is copy space in the black background.

Italy: Negroni

This boozy drink is a take on another classic Italian cocktail, the Americano, which replaces soda water for gin. Negronis are now enjoyed all over the world, but the bitter aperitif Campari makes it quintessentially Italian. Have one in the late afternoon to channel Italy’s aperitivo hour.

IngredientsHow to Make It
– 1 oz gin
– 1 oz Campari
– 1 oz sweet vermouth
Orange peel
– Prosecco (optional)
Add gin, Campari, and vermouth to a mixing glass filled with ice and stir until well-chilled. Strain into a rocks glass. Garnish with an orange peel. If you’d prefer a lighter take, top it off with Processo.
Beautiful view of famous Mirabell Gardens with the old historic Fortress Hohensalzburg in the background in Salzburg, Austria

Austria: Elderflower Shandy

This is the only drink on this list created entirely by the author, but while you likely won’t find this exact recipe in any Viennese bar, the elderflower cordial and traditional lager scream Austria. It’s super refreshing on a hot day and can easily be made non-alcoholic by substituting seltzer for beer. Not sure where to pick up elderflower cordial? Our friends at Terrain have you covered.

IngredientsHow to Make It
– 3/4 oz elderflower cordial
– 1 oz lemon juice
– 1 oz simple syrup
– Bottle lager such as Stiegl Goldbrau
– 1 oz vodka (optional)
Add all ingredients to a large glass filled with ice.
Nothing beats a cold Cocktail on a hot summer's day. Taken on Ipanema Beach, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

Brazil: Caipirinha

If you’re a fan of mojitos, chances are you’ll love Brazil’s version made with their national spirit, cachaça—a more robust spirit than rum thanks to the raw sugarcane. The drink was originally based on a home remedy for the flu or common cold, so drink up! It’s good for your health. But hey, we’re not doctors.

Ingredients How to Make It
– 1/2 lime, quartered
– 2 tsp sugar
– 2 oz cachaça
Add lime quarters and sugar to an old-fashioned glass and muddle. Fill with ice and add cachaça. Garnish with a lime wedge.
Margarita cocktail  with lemon slices and mint leaf.

Mexico: Spicy Grapefruit Margarita

Anyone who drinks has probably had a classic margarita at some point, so why not try a twist on the original with some bitter grapefruit and spice? You might even splurge on some Casamigos Blanco for the perfect blend. If you’re not a fan of spicy drinks, this recipe is just as good without the jalapeño.

IngredientsHow to Make It
– 2 oz blanco tequila
– 1 oz grapefruit juice
– 1/2 oz lime juice
– 1/2 oz lemon juice
– 1/2 oz triple sec
– 1/2 oz simple syrup
– 2-3 slices jalapeño
Add jalapeño slices to a shaker and lightly crush. Add all other ingredients, fill with ice, and shake until well-chilled. Strain into a glass filled with crushed ice.
mai tai cocktail at beach in Hawaii

Hawaii: Mai Tai

So this cocktail might not technically be international for those of us in the United States (it was originally created at Trader Vic’s in California), a sip of this will instantly transport you to the tropics with its blend of rum and fruits. Many variations of Mai Tais exist—it’s common to find pineapple juice in the Hawaiian versions—but this recipe is closer to the classic. Go for an aged rum like Brugal Añejo to really channel the island vibes.

IngredientsHow to Make It
– 1 1/2 oz rum
– 1/2 oz dry curaçao
– 3/4 oz lime juice
– 1/2 oz orgeat
– 1/4 Demerara syrup (equal parts turbinado sugar and water)
– 1/2 oz dark rum
Add all ingredients except dark rum to a shaker filled with crushed ice and shake until well-chilled. Pour unstrained into an old-fashioned glass. Top with dark rum.
The Place du Tertre with tables of cafe and the Sacre-Coeur in the morning, quarter Montmartre in Paris, France

France: French 75

Tired of just drinking mimosas at boozy brunch? Consider switching to a French 75, which substitutes orange juice for lemon and kicks up the alcohol content with gin. This drink was even featured in Casablanca, so channel your inner Humphrey Bogart and give this iconic cocktail a try.

IngredientsHow to Make It
– 2 oz gin
– 1 oz lemon juice
– 1 oz simple syrup
– 2 oz champagne
Combine gin, lemon juice, and simple syrup in a shaker filled with ice and shake until well-chilled.
Strain into a large flute and top with champagne.

Our Favorite Cocktail Necessities

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