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Travel Tips

10 Ways to Extend Your Travels

Your Snapchats won't last forever, people (although they probably are floating out there in the internet ether). Here, 10 ways to keep track of your travels from self-addressed postcards to personally curated playlists.

Send yourself postcards

Everyone loves receiving snail mail (if you don’t, I’m not sure you’re human) so what better way to remember your trip – and cut through those vicious post-vacay blues – than by finding little pieces of postmarked nostalgia in your mailbox.

Snap some pics

In the day and age of the high-res iPhone, travel photography has never been easier. Download some simple editing apps if you’re looking to up your game – a few of our faves include Camera+, ColorStory, and Manual – and snap, snap, snap away.

Turn your photos into cool keepsakes

Now that you’ve got all of these great photos, have them professionally printed in whatever format speaks to you. Photograph sites like Artifact Uprising, Mpix and Parabo Press take your shots and turn them into next-level linen photo books, engineer prints and even playing cards.

Keep your camera rolling

Keep in mind you’re not making your directorial debut here, guys. A few 10 to 15-second videos and some basic parsing together is all it takes to create a beautiful little time capsule of your experience. Plus, aside from capturing your Grecian sojourn for you and yours to reminisce on from now till forever, there’s always the potential that you could catch something embarrassing and land yourself a spot on America’s Funniest Home Videos (hopefully winning a cash prize that could pay for your next getaway).

Take it to social media

Let’s be real. If you’re not galavanting off to some far-flung island, you’ll likely have WiFi access and you’ll continue to regularly check Facebook/Twitter/Instagram and the countless other forms of social media that have you wrapped around their finger. When it comes to throwing your own vacay-centric posts into the mix, as long as you’re not inundating your followers with 1,000s of photos of your hotel’s continental breakfast, they’ll likely appreciate the update. Plus, you’ll leave a digital footprint for Timehop to throw back at you next year.

Try out the traditional journal

If you’re not a writer (hell, even if you are), traditional journaling can seem daunting, but it doesn’t have to be a grand affair. Get yourself a pretty pocket-size notebook and don’t get hung up on stuff like chronology, penmanship or complete sentences. If you’re one for sticking to a schedule, try writing the same time each day in order to maintain your journaling longevity. If not, try taking advantage of idle moments – like when you’re waiting for your meal at a restaurant or riding around on public transportation.

Blog your heart out

Traditional journaling just isn’t for everyone, and if you’re having a truly horrible time trying to get yourself to write in one, an online version might just be for you. Blogs give you the option to try out a bunch of different formats and work in all types of mixed media, not to mention they’re a great platform for sharing with friends and family.

Glitter glue it all down in a scrapbook

If you’ve got even a single crafty bone in your body, scrapbooking is an A+ answer to travel commemoration. Just thinking of all of the stickers, patterned cardstock, and color-coordination has us as excited as a little kid going back to school shopping.

Start a mini collection

Collecting small tokens from your travels is one of the easiest ways to hold onto otherwise fleeting experiences. One major bonus of keeping track of business cards, maps, tickets, menus, and even receipts? You can offer friends personal suggestions and keep a log of the places you’d like to eventually return to.

Curate your own travel playlist

Whether you make a pre-trip playlist or create one as your traveling, music is a surefire way to commit your travels to memory. I personally guarantee that if you’re traveling cross-country with a pal, singing along to Queen as you try (and fail) to imitate Freddie Mercury’s four-octave range, you won’t be quick to forget it.

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